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NDAR provides a single access to de-identified autism research data. For permission to download data, you will need an NDAR account with approved access to NDAR or a connected repository (AGRE, IAN, or the ATP). For NDAR access, you need to be a research investigator sponsored by an NIH recognized institution with federal wide assurance. See Request Access for more information.

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Collection Summary Collection Charts
Collection Title Collection Investigators Collection Description
Biological and Information Processing Mechanisms Underlying Autism
Nancy Minshew, M.D., Mark Strauss, Ph.D., Kevin Pelphrey, Ph.D., Marcel Just, Ph.D., Thomas Mitchell, Ph.D., and Diane Williams, Ph.D. 
This center focuses on elucidating fundamental information processing and neurobiological mechanisms causing autism with studies of infant siblings, first-diagnosed toddlers, and groups of children, adolescents, and adults with and without autism. Project I: Development of Categorization Knowledge in Low Functioning Autism focuses on the earliest manifestations of autism and information processing mechanisms underlying social and cognitive symptoms. Project II: Disturbances of Affective Contact: Development of Brain Mechanisms for Emotion Processing focuses on how individuals with autism experience, understand and regulate emotion; genetic influences are also considered; Project III: Systems Connectivity Activation: Imaging Studies of Language focuses on delineating disturbances in functional brain connectivity underlying the impaired processing of information and innovative machine-learning studies of how the brain identifies and categorizes words.
NDAR
Closed
Shared
$9,700,596.00
1,064
1345
692

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NIH - Extramural None


P50HD055748-01 Biological and Information Processing Mechanisms Underlying Autism 08/06/2007 07/31/2012 1345 692 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT PITTSBURGH $9,700,596.00

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Experiments

To create a new Omics, eye tracking, fMRI, or EEG experiment, press the "+ New Experiment" button. Once an experiment is created, then raw files for these types of experiments should be provided, associating the experiment – through Experiment_ID – with the metadata defined in the experiments interface.

IDNameCreated DateStatusType
No records found.

Collection Owners and those with Collection Administrator permission, may edit a collection. The following is currently available for Edit on this page:

Shared Data

Data structures with the number of subjects submitted and shared are provided.

Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised (ADI-R) Clinical Assessments 237
Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) - Module 4 Clinical Assessments 219
Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS)- Module 1 Clinical Assessments 102
Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS)- Module 2 Clinical Assessments 76
Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS)- Module 3 Clinical Assessments 110
Benton Facial Recognition Test Clinical Assessments 354
CELF-4 Clinical Eval of Lang Fundamentals, 4th ed Clinical Assessments 33
CHARGE Family Characteristics Questionnaire Clinical Assessments 415
CHARGE Medical History Clinical Assessments 315
CHARGE Physical Exam Clinical Assessments 299
Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) 6-18 Clinical Assessments 128
Children's Communication Checklist - 2 Clinical Assessments 102
Children's Memory Scale (CMS) - Ages 5 to 8 Clinical Assessments 34
Children's Memory Scale (CMS) - Ages 9 to 16 Clinical Assessments 126
Demographics - Pittsburgh Clinical Assessments 1035
Finger Tapping Test Clinical Assessments 366
Grooved Pegboard Test Clinical Assessments 361
Image Imaging 75
Laterality Dominance Clinical Assessments 458
M-CHAT Clinical Assessments 94
MacArthur-Bates CDI - Words and Gestures Form Clinical Assessments 88
MacArthur-Bates CDI - Words and Sentences Form Clinical Assessments 67
Modified CHARGE Family Medical History (2007) Clinical Assessments 415
Mullen Scales of Early Learning Clinical Assessments 141
NEO Five-Factor Inventory Form S Adult Clinical Assessments 61
Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (RMET) Clinical Assessments 380
Research Subject Clinical Assessments 813
Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) - Lifetime Clinical Assessments 325
Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) Clinical Assessments 175
Test of Language Competence Expanded Edition Clinical Assessments 349
Theory of Mind John and Mary Clinical Assessments 220
Theory of Mind Peter and Jane Clinical Assessments 220
Theory of Mind Sally and Anne Clinical Assessments 220
Twenty Questions Task Clinical Assessments 37
Vineland-II - Parent and Caregiver Rating Form (2005) Clinical Assessments 406
Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) Clinical Assessments 463
Wide Range Achievement Test 4 (WRAT4) Clinical Assessments 459
Woodcock Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement Clinical Assessments 37

Collection Owners and those with Collection Administrator permission, may edit a collection. The following is currently available for Edit on this page:

Publications

Publications relevant to NDAR data are listed below. Most displayed publications have been associated with the grant within Pubmed. Use the "+ New Publication" button to add new publications. Publications relevant/not relevant to data expected are categorized. Relevant publications are then linked to the underlying data by selecting the Create Study link. Study provides the ability to define cohorts, assign subjects, define outcome measures and lists the study type, data analysis and results. Analyzed data and results are expected in this way.

PubMed IDStudyTitleJournalAuthorsDateStatus
27748031Create StudyFunctional connectivity differences in autism during face and car recognition: underconnectivity and atypical age-related changes.Developmental scienceLynn AC, Padmanabhan A, Simmonds D, Foran W, Hallquist MN, Luna B, O'Hearn KOctober 2016Not Determined
27696184Create StudyPerception of Life as Stressful, Not Biological Response to Stress, is Associated with Greater Social Disability in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.Journal of autism and developmental disordersBishop-Fitzpatrick L, Minshew NJ, Mazefsky CA, Eack SMJanuary 2017Not Determined
27314943Create StudyAssociations between gross motor and communicative development in at-risk infants.Infant behavior & developmentLebarton ES, Iverson JMAugust 2016Not Determined
27242630Create StudyPerformance of Motor Sequences in Children at Heightened vs. Low Risk for ASD: A Longitudinal Study from 18 to 36 Months of Age.Frontiers in psychologyFocaroli V, Taffoni F, Parsons SM, Keller F, Iverson JMJanuary 2016Not Determined
26940029Create StudyNo difference in cross-modal attention or sensory discrimination thresholds in autism and matched controls.Vision researchHaigh SM, Heeger DJ, Heller LM, Gupta A, Dinstein I, Minshew NJ, Behrmann MMarch 1, 2016Not Determined
26520147Create StudyAltered Gesture and Speech Production in ASD Detract from In-Person Communicative Quality.Journal of autism and developmental disordersMorett LM, O'Hearn K, Luna B, Ghuman ASMarch 2016Not Determined
26484826Create StudyDiminished neural adaptation during implicit learning in autism.NeuroImageSchipul SE, Just MAJanuary 15, 2016Not Determined
26343932Create StudyGesture development in toddlers with an older sibling with autism.International journal of language & communication disordersLebarton ES, Iverson JMJanuary 2016Not Determined
26093390Create StudyConcern for Another's Distress in Toddlers at High and Low Genetic Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder.Journal of autism and developmental disordersCampbell SB, Leezenbaum NB, Schmidt EN, Day TN, Brownell CANovember 2015Not Determined
26011310Create StudyOver-Responsiveness and Greater Variability in Roughness Perception in Autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchHaigh SM, Minshew N, Heeger DJ, Dinstein I, Behrmann MMarch 2016Not Determined
26011184Create StudyAbnormalities in brain systems supporting individuation and enumeration in autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchO'Hearn K, Velanova K, Lynn A, Wright C, Hallquist M, Minshew N, Luna BJanuary 2016Not Determined
25846907Create StudyVisual and Vestibular Induced Eye Movements in Verbal Children and Adults with Autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchFurman JM, Osorio MJ, Minshew NJDecember 2015Not Determined
25821925Create StudyMaking Inferences: Comprehension of Physical Causality, Intentionality, and Emotions in Discourse by High-Functioning Older Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Autism.Journal of autism and developmental disordersBodner KE, Engelhardt CR, Minshew NJ, Williams DLSeptember 2015Not Relevant
25727858Create StudyMulticenter mapping of structural network alterations in autism.Human brain mappingValk SL, Di Martino A, Milham MP, Bernhardt BCJune 2015Not Relevant
25689930Create StudyThe Development of Coordinated Communication in Infants at Heightened Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder.Journal of autism and developmental disordersParladé MV, Iverson JMJuly 2015Not Determined
25524571Create StudyThe relationship between stress and social functioning in adults with autism spectrum disorder and without intellectual disability.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchBishop-Fitzpatrick L, Mazefsky CA, Minshew NJ, Eack SMApril 2015Not Relevant
25461818Create StudyIdentifying autism from neural representations of social interactions: neurocognitive markers of autism.PloS oneJust MA, Cherkassky VL, Buchweitz A, Keller TA, Mitchell TM2014Not Determined
25432506Create StudySocial engagement with parents in 11-month-old siblings at high and low genetic risk for autism spectrum disorder.Autism : the international journal of research and practiceCampbell SB, Leezenbaum NB, Mahoney AS, Day TN, Schmidt ENNovember 2015Not Determined
25326820Create StudyCortical variability in the sensory-evoked response in autism.Journal of autism and developmental disordersHaigh, Sarah M; Heeger, David J; Dinstein, Ilan; Minshew, Nancy; Behrmann, MarleneMay 2015Not Relevant
25019999Create StudyDevelopmental plateau in visual object processing from adolescence to adulthood in autism.Brain and cognitionO'Hearn K, Tanaka J, Lynn A, Fedor J, Minshew N, Luna BOctober 2014Not Determined
24610869Create StudyEmotion regulation patterns in adolescents with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: comparison to typically developing adolescents and association with psychiatric symptoms.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchMazefsky CA, Borue X, Day TN, Minshew NJJune 2014Not Determined
24535689Create StudyMisinterpretation of facial expressions of emotion in verbal adults with autism spectrum disorder.Autism : the international journal of research and practiceEack SM, Mazefsky CA, Minshew NJApril 2015Not Relevant
24326863Create StudyExogenous spatial attention: evidence for intact functioning in adults with autism spectrum disorder.Journal of visionGrubb MA, Behrmann M, Egan R, Minshew NJ, Heeger DJ, Carrasco MDecember 2013Not Determined
24118709Create StudyFine motor skill predicts expressive language in infant siblings of children with autism.Developmental scienceLeBarton ES, Iverson JMNovember 2013Not Determined
24113343Create StudyMaternal verbal responses to communication of infants at low and heightened risk of autism.Autism : the international journal of research and practiceLeezenbaum NB, Campbell SB, Butler D, Iverson JMAugust 2014Not Determined
24104507Create StudyThe association between emotional and behavioral problems and gastrointestinal symptoms among children with high-functioning autism.Autism : the international journal of research and practiceMazefsky CA, Schreiber DR, Olino TM, Minshew NJJuly 2014Not Determined
24027437Create StudyPosture Development in Infants at Heightened vs. Low Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders.Infancy : the official journal of the International Society on Infant StudiesNickel LR, Thatcher AR, Keller F, Wozniak RH, Iverson JMSeptember 2013Not Determined
23774715Create StudyThe autism brain imaging data exchange: towards a large-scale evaluation of the intrinsic brain architecture in autism.Molecular psychiatryDi Martino A, Yan CG, Li Q, Denio E, Castellanos FX, Alaerts K, Anderson JS, Assaf M, Bookheimer SY, Dapretto M, Deen B, Delmonte S, Dinstein I, Ertl-Wagner B, Fair DA, Gallagher L, Kennedy DP, Keown CL, Keysers C, Lainhart JE, Lord C, Luna B, Menon V, Minshew NJ, Monk CS, et al.June 2014Not Determined
23768814Create StudyCommonalities in social and non-social cognitive impairments in adults with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia.Schizophrenia researchEack SM, Bahorik AL, McKnight SA, Hogarty SS, Greenwald DP, Newhill CE, Phillips ML, Keshavan MS, Minshew NJAugust 2013Not Determined
23704935Create StudyDynamic regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56γ1 in nuclei induces cell migration.PloS oneKawahara E, Maenaka S, Shimada E, Nishimura Y, Sakurai H2013Not Determined
23704934Create StudySaccade adaptation abnormalities implicate dysfunction of cerebellar-dependent learning mechanisms in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).PloS oneMosconi MW, Luna B, Kay-Stacey M, Nowinski CV, Rubin LH, Scudder C, Minshew N, Sweeney JA2013Not Determined
23619953Create StudyCognitive enhancement therapy for adults with autism spectrum disorder: results of an 18-month feasibility study.Journal of autism and developmental disordersEack SM, Greenwald DP, Hogarty SS, Bahorik AL, Litschge MY, Mazefsky CA, Minshew NJDecember 2013Not Determined
23495230Create StudyBrain function differences in language processing in children and adults with autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchWilliams DL, Cherkassky VL, Mason RA, Keller TA, Minshew NJ, Just MAAugust 2013Not Determined
23427075Create StudyEndogenous spatial attention: evidence for intact functioning in adults with autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchGrubb MA, Behrmann M, Egan R, Minshew NJ, Carrasco M, Heeger DJApril 2013Not Determined
23381484Create StudyBrief report: is cognitive rehabilitation needed in verbal adults with autism? Insights from initial enrollment in a trial of cognitive enhancement therapy.Journal of autism and developmental disordersEack SM, Bahorik AL, Hogarty SS, Greenwald DP, Litschge MY, Mazefsky CA, Minshew NJSeptember 2013Not Determined
23231694Create StudySpontaneous initiation of communication in infants at low and heightened risk for autism spectrum disorders.Developmental psychologyWinder BM, Wozniak RH, Parladé MV, Iverson JMOctober 2013Not Determined
23200868Create StudyNormal binocular rivalry in autism: implications for the excitation/inhibition imbalance hypothesis.Vision researchSaid CP, Egan RD, Minshew NJ, Behrmann M, Heeger DJJanuary 25, 2013Not Determined
23186793Create StudyThe spectrum of autism-from neuronal connections to behavioral expression.The virtual mentor : VMMazefsky CA, Minshew NJNovember 2010Not Determined
23175749Create StudyObject exploration at 6 and 9 months in infants with and without risk for autism.Autism : the international journal of research and practiceKoterba EA, Leezenbaum NB, Iverson JMFebruary 2014Not Determined
23082151Create StudyIs he being bad? Social and language brain networks during social judgment in children with autism.PloS oneCarter EJ, Williams DL, Minshew NJ, Lehman JF2012Not Determined
23011251Create StudyBrief report: comparability of DSM-IV and DSM-5 ASD research samples.Journal of autism and developmental disordersMazefsky CA, McPartland JC, Gastgeb HZ, Minshew NJMay 2013Not Determined
22998867Create StudyUnreliable evoked responses in autism.NeuronDinstein I, Heeger DJ, Lorenzi L, Minshew NJ, Malach R, Behrmann MSeptember 20, 2012Not Determined
22963232Create StudyThe development of individuation in autism.Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performanceO'Hearn K, Franconeri S, Wright C, Minshew N, Luna BApril 2013Not Determined
22865151Create StudyThe modality shift experiment in adults and children with high functioning autism.Journal of autism and developmental disordersWilliams DL, Goldstein G, Minshew NJApril 2013Not Determined
22843504Create StudyIndividual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorderspi.Human molecular geneticsAnney R, Klei L, Pinto D, Almeida J, Bacchelli E, Baird G, Bolshakova N, Bölte S, Bolton PF, Bourgeron T, Brennan S, Brian J, Casey J, Conroy J, Correia C, Corsello C, Crawford EL, de Jonge M, Delorme R, Duketis E, Duque F, Estes A, Farrar P, Fernandez BA, Folstein SE, et al.November 1, 2012Not Determined
22825929Create StudyA systematic review of psychosocial interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders.Journal of autism and developmental disordersBishop-Fitzpatrick L, Minshew NJ, Eack SMMarch 2013Not Determined
22708002Create StudyCategorization in ASD: The Role of Typicality and Development.Perspectives on language learning and educationGastgeb HZ, Strauss MSMarch 1, 2012Not Determined
22677931Create StudyRevisiting regression in autism: Heller's dementia infantilis. Includes a translation of Über Dementia Infantilis.Journal of autism and developmental disordersWestphal A, Schelinski S, Volkmar F, Pelphrey KFebruary 2013Not Determined
22642847Create StudyASD, a psychiatric disorder, or both? Psychiatric diagnoses in adolescents with high-functioning ASD.Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology : the official journal for the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association, Division 53Mazefsky CA, Oswald DP, Day TN, Eack SM, Minshew NJ, Lainhart JE2012Not Determined
22527700Create StudyLeft visual field biases when infants process faces: a comparison of infants at high- and low-risk for autism spectrum disorder.Journal of autism and developmental disordersDundas E, Gastgeb H, Strauss MSDecember 2012Not Determined
22353426Create StudyAutism as a neural systems disorder: a theory of frontal-posterior underconnectivity.Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviewsJust MA, Keller TA, Malave VL, Kana RK, Varma SApril 2012Not Determined
22318760Create StudyMotor and tactile-perceptual skill differences between individuals with high-functioning autism and typically developing individuals ages 5-21.Journal of autism and developmental disordersAbu-Dahab SM, Skidmore ER, Holm MB, Rogers JC, Minshew NJOctober 2013Not Determined
22200937Create StudyThe development of facial gender categorization in individuals with and without autism: the impact of typicality.Journal of autism and developmental disordersStrauss MS, Newell LC, Best CA, Hannigen SF, Gastgeb HZ, Giovannelli JLSeptember 2012Not Determined
22139431Create StudyCategory formation in autism: can individuals with autism form categories and prototypes of dot patterns?Journal of autism and developmental disordersGastgeb HZ, Dundas EM, Minshew NJ, Strauss MSAugust 2012Not Determined
22095694Create StudyEvidence for involvement of GNB1L in autism.American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric GeneticsChen YZ, Matsushita M, Girirajan S, Lisowski M, Sun E, Sul Y, Bernier R, Estes A, Dawson G, Minshew N, Shellenberg GD, Eichler EE, Rieder MJ, Nickerson DA, Tsuang DW, Tsuang MT, Wijsman EM, Raskind WH, Brkanac ZJanuary 2012Not Determined
21986874Create StudyA lack of left visual field bias when individuals with autism process faces.Journal of autism and developmental disordersDundas EM, Best CA, Minshew NJ, Strauss MSJune 2012Not Determined
21890111Create StudyMultivariate searchlight classification of structural magnetic resonance imaging in children and adolescents with autism.Biological psychiatryUddin LQ, Menon V, Young CB, Ryali S, Chen T, Khouzam A, Minshew NJ, Hardan AYNovember 1, 2011Not Determined
21733887Study (380)The neural basis of deictic shifting in linguistic perspective-taking in high-functioning autism.Brain : a journal of neurologyMizuno A, Liu Y, Williams DL, Keller TA, Minshew NJ, Just MAAugust 2011Relevant
21725037Study (381)Distinctive neural processes during learning in autism.Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)Schipul SE, Williams DL, Keller TA, Minshew NJ, Just MAApril 2012Relevant
21513720Study (379)Autonomy of lower-level perception from global processing in autism: evidence from brain activation and functional connectivity.NeuropsychologiaLiu Y, Cherkassky VL, Minshew NJ, Just MAJune 2011Relevant
21484518Create StudyBrain mechanisms for processing direct and averted gaze in individuals with autism.Journal of autism and developmental disordersPitskel NB, Bolling DZ, Hudac CM, Lantz SD, Minshew NJ, Vander Wyk BC, Pelphrey KADecember 2011Not Determined
21363871Create StudyQuantitative analysis of the shape of the corpus callosum in patients with autism and comparison individuals.Autism : the international journal of research and practiceCasanova MF, El-Baz A, Elnakib A, Switala AE, Williams EL, Williams DL, Minshew NJ, Conturo TEMarch 2011Not Determined
21318641Create StudyCan individuals with autism abstract prototypes of natural faces?Journal of autism and developmental disordersGastgeb HZ, Wilkinson DA, Minshew NJ, Strauss MSDecember 2011Not Determined
21265943Create StudyReduced central white matter volume in autism: implications for long-range connectivity.Psychiatry and clinical neurosciencesJou RJ, Mateljevic N, Minshew NJ, Keshavan MS, Hardan AYFebruary 2011Not Determined
21254449Create StudyDeficits in adults with autism spectrum disorders when processing multiple objects in dynamic scenes.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchO'Hearn K, Lakusta L, Schroer E, Minshew N, Luna BApril 2011Not Determined
20963441Create StudyGenome-scan for IQ discrepancy in autism: evidence for loci on chromosomes 10 and 16.Human geneticsChapman NH, Estes A, Munson J, Bernier R, Webb SJ, Rothstein JH, Minshew NJ, Dawson G, Schellenberg GD, Wijsman EMJanuary 2011Not Determined
20833154Create StudyEnlarged right superior temporal gyrus in children and adolescents with autism.Brain researchJou RJ, Minshew NJ, Keshavan MS, Vitale MP, Hardan AYNovember 11, 2010Not Determined
20832784Create StudyThe anatomy of the callosal and visual-association pathways in high-functioning autism: a DTI tractography study.Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behaviorThomas C, Humphreys K, Jung KJ, Minshew N, Behrmann M2011 Jul-AugNot Determined
20813119Create StudyLack of developmental improvement on a face memory task during adolescence in autism.NeuropsychologiaO'Hearn K, Schroer E, Minshew N, Luna BNovember 2010Not Determined
20740492Study (378)Cortical underconnectivity coupled with preserved visuospatial cognition in autism: Evidence from an fMRI study of an embedded figures task.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchDamarla SR, Keller TA, Kana RK, Cherkassky VL, Williams DL, Minshew NJ, Just MAOctober 2010Relevant
20531469Create StudyFunctional impact of global rare copy number variation in autism spectrum disorders.NaturePinto D, Pagnamenta AT, Klei L, Anney R, Merico D, Regan R, Conroy J, Magalhaes TR, Correia C, Abrahams BS, Almeida J, Bacchelli E, Bader GD, Bailey AJ, Baird G, Battaglia A, Berney T, Bolshakova N, Bölte S, Bolton PF, Bourgeron T, Brennan S, Brian J, Bryson SE, Carson AR, et al.July 15, 2010Not Determined
20471358Create StudyNormal movement selectivity in autism.NeuronDinstein I, Thomas C, Humphreys K, Minshew N, Behrmann M, Heeger DJMay 13, 2010Not Determined
20446172Create StudyExperimental manipulation of face-evoked activity in the fusiform gyrus of individuals with autism.Social neurosciencePerlman SB, Hudac CM, Pegors T, Minshew NJ, Pelphrey KA2011Not Determined
20437604Create StudyGender discrimination of eyes and mouths by individuals with autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchBest CA, Minshew NJ, Strauss MSApril 2010Not Determined
20413799Create StudyCortical gyrification in autistic and Asperger disorders: a preliminary magnetic resonance imaging study.Journal of child neurologyJou RJ, Minshew NJ, Keshavan MS, Hardan AYDecember 2010Not Determined
20300817Create StudyMemory awareness for faces in individuals with autism.Journal of autism and developmental disordersWilkinson DA, Best CA, Minshew NJ, Strauss MSNovember 2010Not Determined
20154614Create StudyThe nature of brain dysfunction in autism: functional brain imaging studies.Current opinion in neurologyMinshew NJ, Keller TAApril 2010Not Determined
20097663Create StudyDorsolateral prefrontal cortex magnetic resonance imaging measurements and cognitive performance in autism.Journal of child neurologyGriebling J, Minshew NJ, Bodner K, Libove R, Bansal R, Konasale P, Keshavan MS, Hardan AJuly 2010Not Determined
20056152Create StudyBrain mechanisms for representing what another person sees.NeuroImageHeyda RD, Green SR, Vander Wyk BC, Morris JP, Pelphrey KAApril 1, 2010Not Determined
19950303Create StudyLocal vs. global approaches to reproducing the Rey Osterrieth Complex Figure by children, adolescents, and adults with high-functioning autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchKuschner ES, Bodner KE, Minshew NJDecember 2009Not Determined
19877157Create StudyPrototype formation in autism: can individuals with autism abstract facial prototypes?Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchGastgeb HZ, Rump KM, Best CA, Minshew NJ, Strauss MSOctober 2009Not Determined
19812673Create StudyA genome-wide linkage and association scan reveals novel loci for autism.NatureWeiss LA, Arking DE, Daly MJ, Chakravarti AOctober 2009Not Determined
19781917Create StudyCorpus callosum volume in children with autism.Psychiatry researchHardan AY, Pabalan M, Gupta N, Bansal R, Melhem NM, Fedorov S, Keshavan MS, Minshew NJOctober 30, 2009Not Determined
19765010Create StudyThe development of emotion recognition in individuals with autism.Child developmentRump KM, Giovannelli JL, Minshew NJ, Strauss MS2009 Sep-OctNot Determined
19708061Create StudyShared and idiosyncratic cortical activation patterns in autism revealed under continuous real-life viewing conditions.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchHasson U, Avidan G, Gelbard H, Vallines I, Harel M, Minshew N, Behrmann MAugust 2009Not Determined
19520362Create StudyA preliminary longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study of brain volume and cortical thickness in autism.Biological psychiatryHardan AY, Libove RA, Keshavan MS, Melhem NM, Minshew NJAugust 15, 2009Not Determined
19422619Create StudyAction understanding in the superior temporal sulcus region.Psychological scienceWyk BC, Hudac CM, Carter EJ, Sobel DM, Pelphrey KAJune 2009Not Determined
19404256Create StudyCommon genetic variants on 5p14.1 associate with autism spectrum disorders.NatureWang K, Zhang H, Ma D, Bucan M, Glessner JT, Abrahams BS, Salyakina D, Imielinski M, Bradfield JP, Sleiman PM, Kim CE, Hou C, Frackelton E, Chiavacci R, Takahashi N, Sakurai T, Rappaport E, Lajonchere CM, Munson J, Estes A, Korvatska O, Piven J, Sonnenblick LI, Alvarez Retuerto AI, Herman EI, et al.May 28, 2009Not Determined
19360658Create StudyMissing the big picture: impaired development of global shape processing in autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchScherf KS, Luna B, Kimchi R, Minshew N, Behrmann MApril 2008Not Determined
19360650Create StudyCortical patterns of category-selective activation for faces, places and objects in adults with autism.Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism ResearchHumphreys K, Hasson U, Avidan G, Minshew N, Behrmann MFebruary 2008Not Determined
19232577Create StudyLateralized response timing deficits in autism.Biological psychiatryD'Cruz AM, Mosconi MW, Steele S, Rubin LH, Luna B, Minshew N, Sweeney JAAugust 2009Not Determined
19165587Create StudyCorpus callosum volume and neurocognition in autism.Journal of autism and developmental disordersKeary CJ, Minshew NJ, Bansal R, Goradia D, Fedorov S, Keshavan MS, Hardan AYJune 2009Not Determined
18954478Create StudyPatterns of visual sensory and sensorimotor abnormalities in autism vary in relation to history of early language delay.Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINSTakarae Y, Luna B, Minshew NJ, Sweeney JANovember 2008Not Determined
18954474Create StudyNeuronal fiber pathway abnormalities in autism: an initial MRI diffusion tensor tracking study of hippocampo-fusiform and amygdalo-fusiform pathways.Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINSConturo TE, Williams DL, Smith CD, Gultepe E, Akbudak E, Minshew NJNovember 2008Not Determined
18812009Create StudyBrainstem volumetric alterations in children with autism.Psychological medicineJou RJ, Minshew NJ, Melhem NM, Keshavan MS, Hardan AYAugust 2009Not Determined
18633829Create StudyAtypical frontal-posterior synchronization of Theory of Mind regions in autism during mental state attribution.Social neuroscienceKana RK, Keller TA, Cherkassky VL, Minshew NJ, Just MA2009Not Determined
18516234Create StudyDo individuals with high functioning autism have the IQ profile associated with nonverbal learning disability?Research in autism spectrum disordersWilliams DL, Goldstein G, Kojkowski N, Minshew NJJune 2008Not Determined
18508243Create StudyAn MRI and proton spectroscopy study of the thalamus in children with autism.Psychiatry researchHardan AY, Minshew NJ, Melhem NM, Srihari S, Jo B, Bansal R, Keshavan MS, Stanley JAJuly 15, 2008Not Determined
18444708Create StudyThe structure of intelligence in children and adults with high functioning autism.NeuropsychologyGoldstein G, Allen DN, Minshew NJ, Williams DL, Volkmar F, Klin A, Schultz RTMay 2008Not Determined
18422548Create StudyAtypical development of face and greeble recognition in autism.Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplinesScherf KS, Behrmann M, Minshew N, Luna BAugust 2008Not Determined
18302014Create StudySensory sensitivities and performance on sensory perceptual tasks in high-functioning individuals with autism.Journal of autism and developmental disordersMinshew NJ, Hobson JASeptember 2008Not Determined
18188537Create StudyVariability in adaptive behavior in autism: evidence for the importance of family history.Journal of abnormal child psychologyMazefsky CA, Williams DL, Minshew NJMay 2008Not Relevant
17869314Create StudyTheory of Mind disruption and recruitment of the right hemisphere during narrative comprehension in autism.NeuropsychologiaMason RA, Williams DL, Kana RK, Minshew N, Just MAJanuary 2008Not Determined

This tab provides a general status on the data expected to be shared. There are two types of data expected.

  1. By Relevant publications — Those publications that reported for the collection's grant and have a status of "relevant" for sharing are listed first. The grantee is expected to share the data specific to those publications using the NDA Study feature. If a publication is erroneously marked relevant, the PI should simply change the status. When sharing a study, only the outcome measures for the subjects/time-points are shared. Other data that have not met the share date, defined below, will remain embargoed. To initiate study creation, simply login, mark your publication as relevant and click on the link listed to begin.

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Relevant Publications
PubMed IDStudyTitleJournalAuthorsDate
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Data Expected
Data ExpectedTargeted EnrollmentInitial SubmissionSubjects SharedStatus
ADOS info iconApproved
Physical Exam info iconApproved
Research Subject and Pedigree info iconApproved
Mullen Scales of Early Learning info iconApproved
Vineland (Parent and Caregiver) info iconApproved
Demographics info iconApproved
ADI-R info iconApproved
Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) info iconApproved
Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) info iconApproved
Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) info iconApproved
Medical History info iconApproved
Laterality Dominance info iconApproved
Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) info iconApproved
Imaging (Structural, fMRI, DTI, PET, microscopy) info iconApproved
Test of Language Competence - Expanded Edition (TLC-E) info iconApproved
Twenty Questions Task info iconApproved
Theory of Mind info iconApproved
Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Achievement info iconApproved
Wide Range Achievement Test info iconApproved
Reading the Mind in the Eyes info iconApproved
NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R) info iconApproved
M-CHAT info iconApproved
MacArthur Bates Communicative Development Inventory info iconApproved
Grooved Pegboard Test info iconApproved
Benton Facial Recognition Test (BFRT) info iconApproved
Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (CELF) info iconApproved
Childrens Communication Checklist-2 (CCC-2) info iconApproved
Childrens Memory Scale (CMS) info iconApproved
Finger Tapping Test info iconApproved
genomics/omics info iconApproved
EEG info iconApproved
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Associated Studies

Studies that have been defined using data from a Collection are important criteria to determine the value of data shared. The number of subjects column displays the counts from this Collection that are included in a Study, out of the total number of subjects in that study. The Data Use column represents whether or not the study is a primary analysis of the data or a secondary analysis. State indicates whether the study is private or shared with the research community.

Study Name Description Number of Subjects
Collection / Total
Data Use State
Derivation of Brain Structure Volumes from MRI Neuroimages hosted by NDAR using NITRC-CE A draft publication is in progress. GitHub repository with code for working with NDAR Data is available here: https://github.com/chaselgrove/ndar **Note this study is ongoing; additional may be added.** 73 / 356 Secondary Analysis Shared
Revising the Social Communication Questionnaire scoring procedures for Autism Spectrum Disorder and potential Social Communication Disorder In analyzing data from the National Database for Autism Research, we examine revising the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ), a commonly used screening instrument for Autism Spectrum Disorder. A combination of Item Response Theory and Mokken scaling techniques were utilized to achieve this and abbreviated scoring of the SCQ is suggested. The psychometric sensitivity of this abbreviated SCQ was examined via bootstrapped Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Additionally, we examined the sensitivity of the abbreviated and total scaled SCQ as it relates to a potential diagnosis of Social (Pragmatic) Communication Disorder (SCD). As SCD is a new disorder introduced with the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5), we identified individuals with potential diagnosis of SCD among individuals with ASD via mixture modeling techniques using the same NDAR data. These analyses revealed two classes or clusters of individuals when considering the two core areas of impairment among individuals with ASD: social communication and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior. 106 / 1021 Secondary Analysis Shared
Derivation of Quality Measures for Structural Images by Neuroimaging Pipelines Using the National Database for Autism Research cloud platform, MRI data were analyzed using neuroimaging pipelines that included packages available as part of the Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC) Computational Environment to derive standardized measures of MR image quality. Structural QA was performed according to Haselgrove, et al (http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fninf.2014.00052/abstract) to provide values for Signal to Noise (SNR) and Contrast to Noise (CNR) Ratios that can be compared between subjects within NDAR and between other public data releases. 73 / 425 Secondary Analysis Shared
The neural basis of deictic shifting in linguistic perspective-taking in high-functioning autism Personal pronouns, such as 'I' and 'you', require a speaker/listener to continuously re-map their reciprocal relation to their referent, depending on who is saying the pronoun. This process, called 'deictic shifting', may underlie the incorrect production of these pronouns, or 'pronoun reversals', such as referring to oneself with the pronoun 'you', which has been reported in children with autism. The underlying neural basis of deictic shifting, however, is not understood, nor has the processing of pronouns been studied in adults with autism. The present study compared the brain activation pattern and functional connectivity (synchronization of activation across brain areas) of adults with high-functioning autism and control participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a linguistic perspective-taking task that required deictic shifting. The results revealed significantly diminished frontal (right anterior insula) to posterior (precuneus) functional connectivity during deictic shifting in the autism group, as well as reliably slower and less accurate behavioural responses. A comparison of two types of deictic shifting revealed that the functional connectivity between the right anterior insula and precuneus was lower in autism while answering a question that contained the pronoun 'you', querying something about the participant's view, but not when answering a query about someone else's view. In addition to the functional connectivity between the right anterior insula and precuneus being lower in autism, activation in each region was atypical, suggesting over reliance on individual regions as a potential compensation for the lower level of collaborative interregional processing. These findings indicate that deictic shifting constitutes a challenge for adults with high-functioning autism, particularly when reference to one's self is involved, and that the functional collaboration of two critical nodes, right anterior insula and precuneus, may play a critical role for deictic shifting by supporting an attention shift between oneself and others. 30 / 30 Primary Analysis Shared
Derivation of Quality Measures for Time-Series Images by Neuroimaging Pipelines Using the National Database for Autism Research cloud platform, MRI data were analyzed using neuroimaging pipelines that included packages available as part of the Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC) Computational Environment to derive standardized measures of MR image quality. Time series QA was performed according to Friedman, et al. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16952468) providing values for Signal to Noise Ratio that can be compared to other subjects. 75 / 356 Secondary Analysis Shared
Autonomy of lower-level perception from global processing in autism: evidence from brain activation and functional connectivity. Previous behavioral studies have shown that individuals with autism are less hindered by interference from global processing during the performance of lower-level perceptual tasks, such as finding embedded figures. The primary goal of this study was to examine the brain manifestation of such atypicality in high-functioning autism using fMRI. Fifteen participants with high-functioning autism and fifteen age- and IQ-matched typical controls were asked to perform a lower-level perceptual line-counting task in the presence of a distracting depiction of a 3-D object, in which participants counted whether there were more red or more green contours (In a contrasting 3-D task, participants judged whether the same 3-D stimulus objects (but without color in any contours) depicted a possible or impossible 3-D object). We hypothesized that individuals with autism would be less likely than controls to process the global 3-D information (and would hence show fewer neural signs of such interfering 3-D processing) during the lower-level line-counting task. The fMRI results revealed that in the line-counting task, the autism group did not show the increased medial frontal activity (relative to the possibility task), or the increased functional connectivity between the medial frontal region and posterior visual-spatial regions, demonstrated by the control group. Both findings are indices of lesser effort and difficulty in the line-counting task for the autism group than for the control group, attributed to less interference from the 3-D processing in the autism group. In addition, in the line-counting task, the control group showed a positive correlation between a measure of spatial ability (Vandenberg scores) and activation in the medial frontal region, suggesting that more spatially able control participants did more suppression of the irrelevant 3-D background information in order to focus on the line-counting task. The findings collectively indicate that the global 3-D structure of the figure had a smaller effect, if any, on local processing in the group with autism compared to the control group. The results from this study provide the first direct neural evidence of reduced global-to-local interference in autism. 30 / 30 Primary Analysis Shared
Rare Inherited and De Novo CNVs Reveal Complex Contributions to ASD Risk in Multiplex families NOTE: NOT ALL DATA HAS BEEN UPLOADED FOR THIS STUDY. Rare mutations, including copy-number variants (CNVs), contribute significantly to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk. Although their importance has been established in families with only one affected child (simplex families), the contribution of both de novo and inherited CNVs to ASD in families with multiple affected individuals (multiplex families) is less well understood. We analyzed 1,532 families from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) to assess the impact of de novo and rare CNVs on ASD risk in multiplex families. We observed a higher burden of large, rare CNVs, including inherited events, in individuals with ASD than in their unaffected siblings (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7), but the rate of de novo events was significantly lower than in simplex families. In previously characterized ASD risk loci, we identified 49 CNVs, comprising 24 inherited events, 19 de novo events, and 6 events of unknown inheritance, a significant enrichment in affected versus control individuals (OR = 3.3). In 21 of the 30 families (71%) in whom at least one affected sibling harbored an established ASD major risk CNV, including five families harboring inherited CNVs, the CNV was not shared by all affected siblings, indicating that other risk factors are contributing. We also identified a rare risk locus for ASD and language delay at chromosomal region 2q24 (implicating NR4A2) and another lower-penetrance locus involving inherited deletions and duplications of WWOX. The genetic architecture in multiplex families differs from that in simplex families and is complex, warranting more complete genetic characterization of larger multiplex ASD cohorts. 1 / 5288 Primary Analysis Shared
Predictors of self-injurious behaviour exhibited by individuals with autism spectrum disorder Presence of an autism spectrum disorder is a risk factor for development of self-injurious behaviour (SIB) exhibited by individuals with developmental disorders. The most salient SIB risk factors historically studied within developmental disorders are level of intellectual disability, communication deficits and presence of specific genetic disorders. Recent SIB research has expanded the search for risk factors to include less commonly studied variables for people with developmental disorders: negative affect, hyperactivity and impulsivity. 1 / 611 Secondary Analysis Shared
Cortical underconnectivity coupled with preserved visuospatial cognition in autism: Evidence from an fMRI study of an embedded figures task. Individuals with high-functioning autism sometimes exhibit intact or superior performance on visuospatial tasks, in contrast to impaired functioning in other domains such as language comprehension, executive tasks, and social functions. The goal of the current study was to investigate the neural bases of preserved visuospatial processing in high-functioning autism from the perspective of the cortical underconnectivity theory. We used a combination of behavioral, functional magnetic resonance imaging, functional connectivity, and corpus callosum morphometric methodological tools. Thirteen participants with high-functioning autism and 13 controls (age-, IQ-, and gender-matched) were scanned while performing an Embedded Figures Task. Despite the ability of the autism group to attain behavioral performance comparable to the control group, the brain imaging results revealed several group differences consistent with the cortical underconnectivity account of autism. First, relative to controls, the autism group showed less activation in the left dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal areas and more activation in visuospatial (bilateral superior parietal extending to inferior parietal and right occipital) areas. Second, the autism group demonstrated lower functional connectivity between higher-order working memory/executive areas and visuospatial regions (between frontal and parietal-occipital). Third, the size of the corpus callosum (an index of anatomical connectivity) was positively correlated with frontal-posterior (parietal and occipital) functional connectivity in the autism group. Thus, even in the visuospatial domain, where preserved performance among people with autism is observed, the neuroimaging signatures of cortical underconnectivity persist. 26 / 26 Primary Analysis Shared
Distinctive Neural Processes during Learning in Autism This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared the neural activation patterns of 18 high-functioning individuals with autism and 18 IQ-matched neurotypical control participants as they learned to perform a social judgment task. Participants learned to identify liars among pairs of computer-animated avatars uttering the same sentence but with different facial and vocal expressions, namely those that have previously been associated with lying versus truth-telling. Despite showing a behavioral learning effect similar to the control group, the autism group did not show the same pattern of decreased activation in cortical association areas as they learned the task. Furthermore, the autism group showed a significantly smaller increase in interregion synchronization of activation (functional connectivity) with learning than did the control group. Finally, the autism group had decreased structural connectivity as measured by corpus callosum size, and this measure was reliably related to functional connectivity measures. The findings suggest that cortical underconnectivity in autism may constrain the ability of the brain to rapidly adapt during learning. 35 / 35 Primary Analysis Shared
Psychometric Analysis of the Social Communication Questionnaire Using an Item-Response Theory Framework: Implications for the Use of the Lifetime and Current Forms The Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) was developed as a screener of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). To date, the majority of the SCQ utility studies focused on its external validity (e.g., ROC curve analyses), but very few have addressed the internal validity issues. With samples consisting of 2,134 individuals available from the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR), the current study examined the factor structure, item-level characteristics, and measurement equivalence of the SCQ forms (i.e., Lifetime form and Current form) using both the classical true score theory and the item response theory (IRT). While our findings indicate sufficient psychometric properties of the SCQ Lifetime form, measurement issues emerged with respect to the SCQ Current form. These issues include lower internal consistencies, a weaker factor structure, lower item discriminations, significant pseudo-guessing effects, and subscale-level measurement bias. Thus, we caution researchers and clinicians about the use of the SCQ Current form. In particular, it seems inappropriate to use the Current form as an alternative to the Lifetime form among children younger than 5 years old or under other special situations (e.g., teacher-report data), although such practices were advised by the publisher of the SCQ. Instead, we recommend modifying the wording of the Lifetime form items rather than switching to the Current form where a 3-month timeframe is specified for responding to SCQ items. Future studies may consider investigating the association between the temporality of certain behaviors and the individual’s potential for being diagnosed with ASD, as well as the age neutrality of the SCQ. 321 / 2134 Secondary Analysis Shared
The Sensitivity and Specificity of the Social Communication Questionnaire for Autism Spectrum Disorder with Respect to Age Scientific Abstract The Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) assesses communication skills and social functioning in screening for symptoms of autism-spectrum disorder (ASD). The SCQ is recommended for individuals between 4 to 40 years with a cutoff score of 15 for referral. Mixed findings have been reported regarding the recommended cutoff score’s ability to accurately classify an individual as at-risk for ASD (sensitivity) versus an individual as not at-risk for ASD (specificity). Based on a sample from the National Database for Autism Research (n=344; age: 1.58 to 25.92 years old), the present study examined the SCQ’s sensitivity versus specificity across a range of ages. We recommend that the cutoff scores for the SCQ be re-evaluated with age as a consideration. Lay Abstract The age neutrality of the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) was examined as a common screener for ASD. Mixed findings have been reported regarding the recommended cutoff score’s ability to accurately classify an individual as at-risk for ASD (sensitivity) versus accurately classifying an individual as not at-risk for ASD (specificity). With a sample from the National Database for Autism Research, the present study examined the SCQ’s sensitivity versus specificity. Analyses indicated that the actual sensitivity and specificity scores were lower than initially reported by the creators of the SCQ. 6 / 339 Secondary Analysis Shared
Derivation of Brain Structure Volumes from MRI Neuroimages hosted by NDAR using C-PAC pipeline and ANTs An automated pipeline was developed to reference Neuroimages hosted by the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) and derive volumes for distinct brain structures using Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) and the Configurable-Pipeline for the Analysis of Connectomes (C-PAC) platform. This pipeline utilized the ANTs cortical thickness methodology discuessed in "Large-Scale Evaluation of ANTs and Freesurfer Cortical Tchickness Measurements" [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24879923] to extract a cortical thickness volume from T1-weighted anatomical MRI data gathered from the NDAR database. This volume was then registered to an stereotaxic-space anatomical template (OASIS-30 Atropos Template) which was acquired from the Mindboggle Project webpage [http://mindboggle.info/data.html]. After registration, the mean cortical thickness was calculated at 31 ROIs on each hemisphere of the cortex and using the Desikan-Killiany-Tourville (DKT-31) cortical labelling protocol [http://mindboggle.info/faq/labels.html] over the OASIS-30 template. **NOTE: This study is ongoing; additional data my be available in the future.** As a result, each subject that was processed has a cortical thickness volume image and a text file with the mean thickness ROIs (in mm) stored in Amazon Web Services (AWS) Simple Storage Service (S3). Additionally, these results were tabulated in an AWS-hosted database (through NDAR) to enable simple, efficient querying and data access. All of the code used to perform this analysis is publicly available on Github [https://github.com/FCP-INDI/ndar-dev]. Additionally, as a computing platform, we developed an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) that comes fully equipped to run this pipeline on any dataset. Using AWS Elastic Cloud Computing (EC2), users can launch our publicly available AMI ("C-PAC with benchmark", AMI ID: "ami-fee34296", N. Virginia region) and run the ANTs cortical thickness pipeline. The AMI is fully compatible with Sun Grid Engine as well; this enables users to perform many pipeline runs in parallel over a cluster-computing framework. 73 / 1540 Secondary Analysis Shared
* Data not on individual level